How to build a simple, awesome workbench.

by LetsFlyRC | September 10, 2014 | (16 Ratings) Posted in How To

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I have been using a glass top table for about a year now, and I absolutely love it.  My hot glue doesn't stick to the table, and when it does, I can use a razor blade, and scrape anything and everything off, and create a completely clean surface again.  

The cutting mats fit nicely under the glass, and they allow for accurate measurement, without damaging your cutting mats.  When I first started building, I got hot glue, and CA all over those mats, and, with a rasor blade, tried to remove it.  It wasn't all that easy, and I removed a lot of the measurement lines when doing it.

I hope you enjoy the video showing you how to quickly, and cheaply build a great work bench

 

 

 

Metal was placed under the mats, so that magnets would hold down anything you are planning on working on.  This idea came from Fred, (flying monkey) in the forums.

 

Put the screws into the holes, so that they are long enough.

Comments

Yogenh on September 11, 2014
very good it would be nice if you could still fold it. But then you wouldn't have as big a flat top to work on.
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rbartlett on September 12, 2014
I like you table idea. I especially like the door as a surface. I do question spending $60 on cutting mats if you are going to use a glass top. Why not just draw out you own grid on the table.
Great idea and keep up the videos.
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shermanhartman on September 12, 2014
If youre using the glass to cover it, why not go get a big grid printed on a plotter? A lot less work, and it would only be like 10 bucks from a copy place.
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LetsFlyRC on September 26, 2014
Good idea about the grid, guys. I didn't think of that. And I have a plotter, lol.
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ttprigg on September 26, 2014
Looks like a great idea. I have the same problem with the hot glue. I am wondering how the blades hold up with the glass as the cutting surface. Do you think that you need to replace blades more frequently?
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LetsFlyRC on September 26, 2014
Good question, ttprigg. The blades slide alomg the glass without penetrating. Since they don't actually have any resistance or friction against the surface, the glass doesn't dull the blade. The foamboard does way more damage to the blade. I also do window tinting for a living, and, as long as the blade is sharp, and stainless steel, it won't cut into the glass. We only seem to gouge the glass when blades get really dull, and you can feel the friction when that happens.
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ttprigg on September 26, 2014
Thanks- I'm going to keep my eye out for an old slider...
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LetsFlyRC on September 26, 2014
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